Author Archives: Luke Errington

Amber and Marks trip to Chiloe Island and Torres del Paine

Amber and Marks trip to Chiloe Island and Torres del Paine

Amber and Mark give us some wonderful feedback from their trip to Chiloe Island, Torres del Paine, and Los Glaciares in March 2015, as well as some great tips for people considering a similar itinerary.

Amber and Mark’s Itinerary

After arriving in Santiago, Amber and Mark flew to Puerto Montt and onto the island of Chiloe, where they enjoyed a scenic drive through The Bay of Caulin- A fantastic spot to see local and migratory birds. Whilst in Chiloe they stayed at the homestay of La Casita del Mar and enjoyed two days of trekking and sea kayaking in the Bay of Ancud. An early morning transfer took them to Puerto Montt airport where they flew to Punta Arenas and then took a bus for the rest of the journey to Puerto Natales.

After a night at the Hotel Indigo, they embarked on a self guided W trek in Torres del Paine, staying in various cabin’s, Refugio’s and Hotels. Their self guided trek took them to some of the most impressive sights that Torres del Paine has to offer – The famous towers, Lago Noredenskjold, the French Valley and the Grey Glacier.

In the last few days of their trip they enjoyed a guided excursion to the Perito Moreno glacier  before taking some self guided day hikes to Laguna Torre, Laguna de los tres and Loma del Pliegue Tumbado from El Chalten.

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Amber & Mark’s Feedback

How was your time in Chiloe?

Swoop’s partners in Chiloe were amazing, Britt made us two delicious meals (so similar to how I cook that it was wonderfully comforting) and was a gracious host. They were appropriately attentive and kind. Our kayak day was perfect and Jack gave great tips on where to go. The dogs were amazing. :-)

James was a great guide, he was super knowledgeable and clearly passionate about Chile. I would not have guessed that he had only recently moved to Chiloe from Santiago. In hindsight, we probably would have preferred a little less time with a guide, as it felt a little more scheduled that perhaps we would have liked.

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How did you enjoy your time in Torres del Paine? 

Laura and Carlos, Swoop’s partners in Torres del Paine were great. They were super helpful when someone stole our bus tickets at Punta Arenas. I would have been helpful to have had more detailed instructions on where to get the bus as I think had we been waiting in the right place, we would have been there to get our tickets before someone else took them.

Laura was also super gracious when we missed our bus to Calafate (the time had been changed to 7am from 8am which she told us on the first day and updated on our voucher but we didn’t update it on our itinerary and we had a very late night the night before due to Grey II being cancelled). She picked us up at the bus station, dropped us at a great coffee shop, and kept our bags for the day.

We had a few complications with the Grey II boat as it was cancelled last minute and we ended up having to hike 3 hours to Grey, then 40 mins round trip to the glacier, and then 3 hours back to Paine Grande to wait 3 hours for the catamaran across Pehoe instead. It was unavoidable but frustrating as we weren’t mentally prepared for it.

The refugios were great. Food was a plenty. It was great overall!

In Puerto Natales, I would recommend staying at the same hotel before and after the W trek for ease. Both the Indigo and Altiplanico were great hotels.

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How did you enjoy your time in El Calafate and El Chalten? 

El Calafate was good. The Perito Moreno glacier was amazing. We took the 3 hour trip, but 3 felt that 2 hours would have been plenty of time.

Swoop’s partner Zoe was nice when we arrived in El Chalten and helpful in adjusting our schedule after our delay in leaving Puerto Natales.

The hotel Senderos was great. The food there was the best we had…on the whole trip! We really liked the Cervercia. We thought La Taperia was overrated. 

Here’s some more information from Swoop’s Harriet on places to eat in Chalten.

Charles and Eva’s Patagonia walking adventure.

Charles and Eva’s Patagonia walking adventure.

Charles and Eva returned in January from a two-week trip to Los Glaciares and Torres del Paine. Here they tell us about their experiences on the trip and share some tips for other people planning a trip.

Charles and Eva’s Feedback:

We would give you five out of five! Our main worry before the trip was the complicated logistics; especially in Torres del Paine in the middle of the busy season. Swoop handled it extremely well; there was always a spot reserved for us on crowded buses and a warm bed waiting for us in the refugios bursting in the seams on a rainy cold day.

Do not do anything differently; you are doing just fine!

We will recommend you to anybody who likes the mountains, is fit enough for some serious walking and understands that life there is still a bit more simple than in Paris or New York.

Charles and Eva’s Itinerary:

Charles and Eva started their journey in El Calafate, where they enjoyed an excursion to the to the Perito Moreno Glacier before heading off to a 6 day hike through Torres del Paine.  While hiking Torres del Paine they took in the sights of Valle Frances, Lago Nordenskjold, Lago Grey and the Towers of Paine. After that they spent 5 days on some self guided day hikes from El Chalten, where they took in some fantastic views of Fitz Roy and came back to the Hostal Los Nires each night to relax and enjoy the evening.

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How were Swoop’s partners in Torres del Paine and Los Glaciares?

Both Laura in Puerto Natales and Zoe in El Chalten were warm and helpful. We had only one or two very minor issues to deal with and both were handled promptly and with competence. In Dittmar we especially appreciated their detailed day-to- day itinerary with the instructions for the dummies. Whenever we were not quite sure about something, we just looked (in Torres Charles was wearing it in a waterproof plastic bag around his neck) and there was always an answer. Good job!

The itinerary was lovely; again, we would not change anything.

We used guide services only during the trip to the Perito Moreno Glacier. The guide was enthusiastic, knowledgeable and bilingual in English and French.

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What was the highlight of your trip?

It is hard to single out just one or two things; the overall experience was very special. We had rain and shine; experienced wind that made us crawl on the belly and a whiteout like in January in the Rockies, but also some incredibly perfect, glorious days with blue skies and jaw-dropping views. We saw condors and vicunas, lovely lenga and nire beech trees, orchids, beautiful tiny alpine wildflowers and more. I think every day there was precious.

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Our tips to other people:

  • Use the wonderful Swoop flexibility and get an extra day or two wherever possible, especially in El Chalten as a backup for a rainy day. We did the Fitz Roy hike twice and it was worth every penny.
  • Learn some Spanish – it really helps.
  • Do not go cheap on GoreTex – it is nice to be dry.
  • We spent five fun days in Buenos Aires. We stayed in a nice hotel in the Microcentro (American Towers; ca $100 a night with all taxes included via Expedia) and did all the touristy things we could think of. We also gained ca 6 pounds each.

Thanks for everything!

Want to have your own walking adventure in Patagonia? Talk to us today. 

Steve and Annie’s hiking adventure in Torres del Paine

Steve and Annie’s hiking adventure in Torres del Paine

Steve and Annie recently came back from Patagonia where they visited the Queulat National Park and Torres del Paine. Read their advice for other travellers planning on doing a similar kind of trip.

Steve and Annie’s feedback:

All in all a great trip.  Your ability to customize the itinerary to meet our schedule was really good.  I would definitely recommend Swoop!  

Steve and Annie’s itinerary:

Steve and Annie started their Patagonia adventure in Puerto Marin Balmaceda, where they were driven to the The Queulat National Park, located in the Aysen Region of Patagonia. They enjoyed a day and a half in the wildlife rich park before leaving for Punta Arenas and making their way to Tierra Patagonia within Torres del Paine. Tierra Patagonia is a little bit of luxury within the wilderness and you can often spot guanaco, foxes, ñandú and a wide variety of birds from the comfort of your room. From this haven they enjoyed multiple activities and particularly enjoyed a hike called ‘Dagostino’ before heading back home via El Calafate.

How did you find your itinerary?

The 1 night in Raul Marin was not worth the extra hours to get there and back.  Fundos Los Leones is a lovely place…but I would recommend a 3 night minimum….there is not a lot to do there, (aside from the water) so it would have to be for someone who wants to chill for a few days.

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What were your highlights and how did you find our partners?

Quelat is a gorgeous place and 1 1/2 days were not enough time….  Especially since Ruta 7 was shut down from 1pm -5pm daily ( and will be for quite some time).  For us on this trip with the limited number of days en route from Futaleufu to Tierra Patagonia I would have skipped this bit and stayed in Futaleufu another day or two and then gone to Chaiten and ferried to Puerto Montt.  We completely enjoyed Tierra Patagonia.

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The guides were well trained and the excursions well designed and matched the descriptions in the materials.  I would especially recommend the hike called Dagostino as it is not as taxing as the French Valley or to the base of the Paines, and has even more stunning views.


Eddie’s El Chalten experience

Eddie’s El Chalten experience

Eddie returned in March 2016 from a trip to Patagonia where he visited Los Glaciares and Torres del Paine national parks, cruised through the Chilean fjords and glaciers, and was fortunate enough to spot 40 whales on a Whale Watching trip! Here he talks about his experiences on the trip and in booking with Swoop.

Eddie’s Feedback:

I cannot really fault anything- the way that Swoop and their partners organised the experience, the people I met, and the places I went to were just amazing. I would visit again in a heartbeat.
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Eddies Itinerary

Eddie started his journey in El Calafate where he stayed in the Hotel Kosten Aike. His first day was spent on an excursion to the impressive Perito Moreno glacier. SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURESNext was some group treks to Laguna de los Tres and Laguna Torre, where he took in some incredible views of Fitz Roy.

Then he spent a couple of days based from an Eco Yurt Camp in Torres del Paine, choosing  from their various excursions and activities.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAEddie then spent four days whale watching, travelling through the Magellan Strait to Carlos III Island – a great trip where you can see penguins, birdlife, whales and sea lions a plenty.


Finally, he took an Adventure Cruise cruise to Ainsworth Bay & Tucker Islets, Pia Glacier & Glacier Alley  ending with a trip to Cape Horn and Wulaia Bay.

How was your trip overall and how did you find your itinerary?

What can I say but well organised and what a treat! The whole experience was more than I could have anticipated, people who I will always remember, Zoe, Pablo, Nicholas In El Chalten where I fell and cut my hand on the second day of walking great people. THANKS TO ALL OF THEM.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAHow was your adventure cruise?

The cruise was as I expected, very well organised perfect staff and food, the outings were brilliant, walks and activities for all levels of fitness.


I sat on table 6 & met two lovely people and a French family. Everybody were great, with like minds, nice company.


On the final night there was an auction for the navigation map, signed by the Captain, I was determined to have it and outbid all others, the chart is now being framed and will be in a point of prominence in my lounge.

How was your whale watching trip

The Whale Watching was incredible, be saw over 40 whales in just 3 days!OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The campsite was rather tired, and the platform on the entrance to my ‘yurt’ had some rotten wood, but this was quickly forgotten when out amongst the whales!

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURESInterested in doing a similar trip? Get in touch with us today to find out more.


Tony’s Patagonia experience

Tony’s Patagonia experience

Tony came back from spending almost a month in Patagonia traveling through some extraordinary landscape on the way. Here he tells us about his experiences in Los Glaciares, Torres del Paine, and the Atacama, and in booking with Swoop Patagonia.


Tony’s Feedback

Overall the trip went perfectly. Everything happened as it was supposed to. The route work really well with hardly any travelling back over the same ground and the amount of time in each part was just right. Although I think you could have done better with the weather it was actually a lot better than I had been expecting from the forecasts just beforehand. This was a great trip. Really wouldn’t have changed anything. Thank you so much.

Tony’s Itinerary

Tony flew into Buenos Aires Airport and in his first full day did a short day hike in Chalten to get a feel for the place, before embarking on a group guided hike the next day to Laguna de Los tres  where you can take in a breathtaking view of Fitzroy. The next day he made the most of his time there by enjoying a self guided hike.

The next step on his journey was catching a bus to El Calafate to see the stunning Perito Moreno glacier before getting ready to embark on the full circuit trek through Torres del Paine.

While trekking through the park Tony stayed in supported camping at different points on the full circuit.  He enjoyed a route that took him through the Ascencio Valley , around Lake Paine , following the Los Perros river before hiking alongside the Grey Glacier and ending up back in the French Valley and spending a night in the Hotel Rio Serrano.

After all that hiking it was time to hit the water and paddle to the serrano waterfall and to the Serrano Glacier where a BBQ lunch was enjoyed.


Next up on his tour of Patagonia was a desert adventure in the Salar Atacama, the driest desert in the world, which is surrounded by imposing volcanoes and is home to unexpected wildlife like flamingos and other birds. While in the Salar Atacama he visited the geothermal fields that are flanked by soaring peaks.

After the harshness of the desert it was back to Buenos Aires for a city tour before heading back home.

How did you find travelling during your trip?

All BA flights were great. Comfortable, excellent staff/service, reasonably good food, great choice of films. However I do think you should advise travellers to book in online beforehand as I didn’t (know) and had no choice of seat (only me so didn’t matter) BUT it was full on the way out and not having checked in on line meant I was potentially kicked off (there was some discussion before I was let through which I believe was to check if there was enough spaces for me). All Internal flights were fine and on time.

My Bus  journey to Salta was great. Thanks so much for getting me the good seats – so comfortable – could have stayed on for another 10 hours, watching the stunning scenery pass by. The buses always provided good views and a nice drive but they always felt very slow. A top tip though is to stop at the info centres that help you get orientated with walks available.


How did you find your hiking expeditions? 

I really enjoyed the 3 day walks – Day one in Tumbado, day 2 Fitzroy ( which was guided) and day 2 Torres del Paine. Walk Patagonia were amazing with lovely staff and the guide was excellent on my walk. My Torres del Paine trek was most excellent despite some poor weather. We were lucky to have great views of the towers as we approached them and great views in and from the French Valley on our last day. The trip to Lagoons/Trip to Geyser were okay but I think it would be better to try and do all of this type of stuff in one day and with an English speaking group the bus very (over an hour) late picking up for geyser trip and then the bus broke down en route so we almost missed the geyser activity.


What were the other excursions on your trip like?

I went on quite a few  different activities while in Patagonia. We went Mountain Biking to Death Valley one afternoon and Moon Valley the next morning, which was a lot of fun and we missed all of the crowds. Horse riding was amazing and I absolutely loved it. We rode 5 hours along and up to and over Death Valley then over the cliff and down the sand dunes. I had only been on a horse for 2 hours walking on the flat before but I was really pleased to be doing something so exciting and there were some incredible views. Although maybe punters should be warned that the path up is narrow, strewn with boulders with vertical drop down one side. For me it was better that I didn’t know however.

My trip to Fortaleza was full of highs and lows. I was a bit concerned when found nobody at the office when I first called in as per itinerary instructions but no big deal. The hike was just the guide, Jose, and myself. Jose was great and really got me through the trip. The conditions in exposed areas was very hairy and some travellers might have been concerned that they hadn’t been warned about how it could be. Personally it was best I didn’t know beforehand and I thoroughly enjoyed the whole experience. It was tranquil, traumatic, challenging, and exciting/ Day 2’sa short paddle in the lagoon is a bit oversold I reckon and I opted not to bother. At night however Jose did me proud with his food preparation and we had a lovely evening even though it rained. The boat trip back to Natales was fine but weather was poor so not quite what it could have been otherwise.


My time in the city of Buenos Aires was lovely. On my initial journey through the city,  it really didn’t look like my sort of place but I loved walking around it on my return. I really enjoyed the marina area, waterfront parks and the Eco Park and it was all helped by the lovely weather and some great sightseeing opportunities.

Interested in a Patagonia adventure like Tony’s? Get in touch with us today.

Torres del Paine – What is a Refugio?

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The refugios in Torres del Paine allow you access to the mountains so that you can complete the entire W trek without the need to camp. There are 8 refugios in Torres del Paine. Torre Central and Norte, Chileno, Cuernos, Domos Frances, Paine Grande, Grey and Dickson


A map of the Torres del Paine refugios

What is a Refugio?

refugio masculine noun

  1. english translation of REFUGIO: refuge, shelter
  2. swoop definition of REFUGIO: warm, friendly, convivial places with shared dorm-style rooms for 6 people, and hot meals and showers. The accommodation is basic but comfortable
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You will find a communal dining room…

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….shared bathrooms…..

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……and 6 person dorms.


And some refugios have an area to hang out.

Your bedding and meals are provided so you only need to carry your trekking clothes, a change of clothing and personal belongings. More on what to pack here.

What will you eat in a refugio?

Refugios provide you with dinner, breakfast and give you a packed lunch.







Each refugio has a small shop selling snacks and a bar with beer, wine and of course pisco sours.

Top Tips for Staying in Refugios

  • We highly recommend you upgrade to a cabin at Refugio Cuernos to get some privacy, bathe in the hot tubs and because Refugio Cuernos does get very crowded. 
  • Don’t forget to take a lightweight travel towel so you can use the hot showers and a headtorch for night time toilet trips.
  • The food is not very inspirational so take some trail mix from the Unimarc supermarket in Puerto Natales and grab some avocados to make your sandwiches a little more tantalising.
  • Wifi is only available occasionally at Paine Grande Refugio and in Hotel Las Torres (a short walk from Refugio Las Torres).  There is almost no phone signal in the park.
  • The showers sometimes run out of hot water so you may want to wait until after dinner.
  • If you would like some privacy then why not camp at a refugio? They will provide you with tent, sleeping bag and mat and you can shower and eat your meals inside the refugio.

unnamed (8)Have some privacy for a night at the Cuernos Cabins

Find out more about trekking Torres del Paine or get in touch with us today.

Sally’s experiences sea kayaking in the Northern Fjords

Sally’s experiences sea kayaking in the Northern Fjords

While on her recent trip to Patagonia, Swoop’s Sally Dodge went on a kayaking expedition in the Northern fjords. Here she gives her day by day account of her experiences and tips for people who are interested in doing the same.

Sea-Kayak, Petrohue River & Relconcavi Fjord

Day 1

An hours drive from Puerto Varas, around the shores of Llanquihue lake leads to the village of Ensenada where our kayaking partners have their main office and store all their equipment. Here, we sorted our possessions into dry bags, checked we all had the correct equipment and then headed off, kayaks on the roof, to drive to the drop in point about 30 minutes away.


At the drop in point, we changed into our wetsuits, received our safety briefing and instructions and then we were off; as we slipped into the river there were enormous salmons jumping out of the water.

The first day of this two day kayak took us down the emerald green Petrohue river which is boarded by thickly vegetated, sheer cliffs. As we paddled down, steering to avoid tree trunks and roots, we were passed frequently by vibrant blue Ringed Kingfishers and Dark Bellied Cinclodes.
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We stopped for lunch on a beach before carrying on down stream to the Ralun hot springs. As the locals sat tucking into their picnics with toes dipped in the hot, steaming water, we certainly created a bit of a stir turning up in our kayaks.

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The hot springs were very rustic – the type with a spade on the side to dig down for the heat.

Back in the kayaks we paddled down to the mouth of the river and out into the most northerly fjord of Chile, the Reloncanvi Fjord. Here the water opened up, the birds changed and the wind got up a little. Passing Peruvian Pelicans and Brown-Hooded Gulls, we paddled our way to the western bank of the fjord to Yoland’s farm. Our paddling work for the day was done.


Nestled amongst rolling hills and shrouded in forest is the achingly picturesque farmhouse of Señora Yolanda. We set up tents at the bottom of her garden and then walked up to the farmhouse for a cup of tea and a guided tour of the farm accompanied by Juan Carlos, her son and Muster, the dog.


Señora Yoland was a real treat. She was house proud and welcoming with a lively character and a beaming smile. Her house was filled with black and white photos of her pioneering ancestors and old calendars showing photos from the dry and sandy north of Chile – a world so far removed from the lush green mountains of Yolanda’s reality.


Our roast lamb dinner was really delicious, cooked in the wood burning oven and seasoned with local herbs; the conversation and experience were really humbling and the house so cosy.

Walking back down the garden, the stars were absolutely incredible.

As I snuggled down in my toasty warm sleeping bag I could hear the water lapping on the shore and nothing else – total and utter silence.

Day 2

I woke up with the first light of the day at 07:15 and opened my tent door to absolute tranquility. The sun was just coming up and with not a breath of wind, the forested hills, clouds, low lying mist and a strip of already bright clear sky was totally mirrored in the fjord below.


The only noises were the cracklings of barnacles, a cormorant flapping its wings to take off and the lapping of water. As the sun rose the high clouds over head turned a beautiful shade of pink and the clouds on the horizon also. Just poking out above the clouds was the tip of the Volcon Yates at 2111m – its snow capped peak was illuminated pink.

As I sat writing peacefully, taking in the surrounding scenery, 3 dolphins appeared, playing in the morning calmness. The cloud cover was high and the sky blue so hopefully we were in for a beautifully sunny day.


Once the rest of the group had risen, we walked up to the farmhouse where the chimney was smoking, a sure sign that Señora Yolanda had made fresh bread. She welcomed us into the kitchen, the table had been set and sure enough there was fresh ‘pan amasado’, fresh eggs, scrambled ‘a la chilena’, and honey.


After breakfast, Juan Carlos took us for another walk around the property proudly showing off his apple press – it was like stepping back 100 years or going to a ‘medieval fair’ in the UK where they have re-enactments of what life was like! This was real, functioning and very much still in operation.

By 11:00, we’d packed up our tents, had said our goodbyes and then got back on the water. As we paddled off I could still see Muster tearing around the field, smoke coming from the chimney and Señora Yolanda tending to the garden – it felt very special to have seen into her world even if just for 1 night.


Paddling across the fjord with the scenery moving much slower than on the river, it really did put into perspective the immense scale of the scenery.

We passed mussel farms and fishing houses made of corrugated iron – these did not look anywhere near as warm, cosy and weather resistant as Señora Yolanda’s house.


Lunch of tuna salad was served on a beach with a 15 minute siesta in the sunshine, how glorious. We then set off for the final hour of paddling rounding the peninsula to reach the village of Cochamo; charming, sleepy with coloured fishing boats and a traditional wooden church.

We’d made it – the weather had been kind, the scenery stunning and the hospitality humbling. The kayak trip was great fun, perfect for a beginner looking to gain some paddling experience, delve deep into the scenery and soak up some local culture.

Find out more about kayaking in the lake district here. 

Eco Yurt Camps in Torres del Paine

Eco Yurt Camps in Torres del Paine

There are two main eco yurt camps in Torres del Paine: Patagonia Camp and EcoCamp. On the face of it, the two are quite similar, in that they both provide yurt/ dome accommodation from where you can explore the national park on day excursions of your choice.

There are a few subtle differences however that are useful to know before making a decision, in order to make sure you to get what you want out of your trip. Hopefully the below will help you to decide which one is for you…


The Patagonia Camp is smaller (18 yurts compared to 25 at Eco Camp), and a little more relaxed compared with the larger, faster paced EcoCamp, which has a higher turnover of guests due to the variety of trips run from it.

Patagonia Camp tends to attract a more mature crowd overall, whereas Eco Camp has a wider variety of ages in general, and is also particularly committed to considering the environment.

Both camps are family friendly, with larger domes available to house up to 4 people.

Community Dome: Eco Camp

Community Dome: Eco Camp

Patagonia Camp Restaurant

Patagonia Camp Restaurant


Patagonia Camp is located a little outside of the National Park, whereas EcoCamp is more centrally located, but actually the travel time from each to the Grey Glacier (for example) is the same.

At EcoCamp you have a view of the Towers, and are in very close proximity to the base of the towers trek starting point. Patagonia Camp, although a little further out, gives you a lake view with the whole Paine Masif as a backdrop, which you can see from your very own private terrace.

Torres del Paine Accommodation Map

Torres del Paine Accommodation Map


There is only one type of yurt at the Patagonia Camp, which has heating (you’ll want this in the colder months!), and a private bathroom, as well as it’s own private terrace. The downside however is that they do not offer a willing to share policy, so there is a single supplement to pay.

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Balcony View- Patagonia Camp

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Patagonia Camp Yurt Interior






That said, the most basic (and cheapest) of the EcoCamp domes (although cheaper for solo travellers, who are allowed to share), does not have heating or a private bathroom. In order to benefit from these facilities you would need a Superior dome or a Suite dome, which are larger, but of course more expensive.

Eco Camp - Standard Dome

Eco Camp – Standard Dome

Eco Camp - Superior Dome

Eco Camp – Superior Dome

Eco Camp - Suite Dome

Eco Camp – Suite Dome

Below is a quick reference table we have created to allow you to compare the different types of domes/ yurts available at each camp.


Dome/ Yurt Comparison table


When it comes to excursions, the Patagonia Camp has many advantages. The group sizes are generally smaller, and the selection of excursions is much more extensive and varied.

Patagonia Camp offers more off the beaten track excursions as well as the standard routes, and include activities other than trekking, such as kayaking and fishing.

Both establishments offer horse riding and other kayaking trips at additional cost.

An advantage of the Eco Camp is that it provides some more specialist activities as well, such as Puma Tracking and a great Multi Activity Winter trip.  They also have a yoga dome for those travellers looking to relax after a hard days trekking!

Horse Riding - EcoCamp

Horse Riding – EcoCamp

Kayaking Excursion - Patagonia Camp

Kayaking Excursion – Patagonia Camp







Patagonia Camp’s excursions are more flexible, with the option to take any one of 20 excursions on any day of the week, compared with a selection of 9 excursions on fixed days of the week at EcoCamp

What the EcoCamp does offer that Patagonia does not, is the option to take a multi day hike, such as the W Trek or Full Circuit.

Base of the Towers

Base of the Towers

Food & Drink

Generally, we have found the food and drink to be of a higher standard at the Patagonia Camp, where you also get to have your own private table for dinner

The wines at Patagonia Camp are very good also, as they have their own vineyard. Both offer unlimited wine with dinner.

Patagonia Camp Cuisine

Patagonia Camp Cuisine

Home made sweets

Patagonia Camp Cuisine










Pricing really depends on the time of year at which you are travelling, so do get in touch with us to find out the exact rates that would apply to you.

Because Patagonia Camp offer only one type of yurt, their pricing is much simpler, they simply have a low and high season rate, which varies according to the number of nights you spend there, and whether you are sharing, or travelling alone.

As they do not offer a willing to share policy, Patagonia Camp is less desirable price wise for solo travellers, because the single supplement really hikes up the price!

Our top tip for visiting Patagonia Camp would be to stay for 5 nights (if time allows you), as the average price per night is much lower that way, allowing you to get the most for your money (however this will be changing in the 16/17 season so get booking now to take advantage!).


VIew of the Patagonia Camp

The Eco Camp prices are somewhat more complicated, as they 4 different season prices, 4 different types of domes, and a different price depending on how many nights you stay, and whether you are a solo traveller willing to share, or want a double/twin, triple, or quadruple room!

The good thing for solo travellers is that there is a (same sex) willing to share policy, and no single supplement is applied if you are willing to do so. They also offer some really excellent low and shoulder season rates.


View over the Eco Camp

What Our Customers Think

Read more about customer experiences of Patagonia Camp and EcoCamp, and Get in Touch for more information and advice.

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‘The eco friendly camp we stayed at exceeded all our expectations. We had the nearest yurt to the lake with distant views of the Horns’ – Ian & Sue on Patagonia Camp – December 2014.


‘The eco camp was great, so unique and beautiful views- we LOVED it, it was awesome’ – Karen on the Eco Camp – November 2014.











Things to do in Ushuaia

Things to do in Ushuaia

Often people find themselves with just a day or half day to spare in Ushuaia between treks, cruises or other activities, so Swoop has compiled this list of suggestions for things to do whilst you’re there.

If you’re planning to spend longer than a day or two in the region the region (perhaps on an Antarctic or Tierra del Fuego Cruise, a Multi day Trek, or a trip to Cape Horn) then do get in touch – we would love to help you!

There is plenty to see and do in Ushuaia itself by simply sightseeing on foot, but if you are feeling a little more adventurous there are number of fantastic day trips you could consider as well…


The Maritime museum of Ushuaia is housed in the former prison of Ushuaia, which was closed down in 1947, and declared a National Historic Monument in 1997. There are some intriguing halls depicting penal life, and an exhibit of incredibly detailed scale models of famous ships spanning 500 years. It provides a really unique insight into the region’s history.

maritime museum

The oldest estancia in the Argentine region of Tierra del Fuego, this picturesque ranch provides a fascinating insight into the history of the region, as well as being an ideal base from which to explore.

est harberton


Spend a morning walking amongst cute Gentoo penguins on Isla Martillo in the Beagle Channel in Tierra del Fuego. On the way you’ll stop at Ushuaia’s most important historical site, Estancia Harberton.


A great opportunity to discover the amazing colour of the Emerald Lagoon and the habitats and behaviours of these intriguing rodents!


nautical boat trips

nautical sailing

From the Sky!

from the sky sml plane

from sky helicopter

Active & Adventurous

Exciting day trips including trekking, canoeing, kayaking, horse riding and wildlife spotting for those who want to try something a little more adventurous.

  • Martial Glacier Hike

Take a taxi to the Cerro Martial ski centre and take the easy hike to the martial glacier for fantastic panoramas of Ushuaia and the Beagle Channel.

A lovely horse back ride between the Beagle channel and Monte Susana, up to panoramic views of Ushuaia’s city and peninsula.

Eating & Drinking

Check out our blog post on top places to eat and drink in Patagonia. A top suggestion for Ushuaia is Ramos Generales, where you can  sample the locally brewed Cape Horn Beer, and one of their speciality Merengue Penguins!eat ramos generalescape horn beer


If you’re looking for a place to stay in Ushuaia then look no further, Swoop has compiled a list of their most recommended Places to Stay in Ushuaia for a variety of budgets.

Peter’s Winter W Trek

Peter’s Winter W Trek

Peter recently came back from a winter W trek, here he tells us about his experiences with Swoop, our partners and the trek itself.

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How was your winter W trek through Torres del Paine?

The walk was great and we were really lucky with the weather.

Day 1 was super windy with a few clouds – but was good to see how harsh this place could be.

Day 2 & 3 were the most perfect blue sky no wind days for the hikes into the french valley and grey glacier.

Day 4 the moving day was totally low cloud, couldn’t see a thing, but was okay because we walked out.

Day 5, was snowing on the drive and first hour or two of the hike to the towers. Then we continued on up through dense fog, and on the last scramble up to the towers it cleared to blue skies, so it couldn’t have been better. Just was we were heading down the fog rolled in again.

Overall our timing could not have been better, yes we got some bad weather but it came at suitable time. Although it made me realise in winter we could have easily been unlucky – we met some people doing hikes at slightly different stages to us and couldn’t see the towers or other parts.
Our guide was great. Couldn’t fault him. Was very accommodating and understanding when Natalie got sick.

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What were the guides like on your trek?

For me, my highlight would have been the walk into the french valley. Obviously the view to the towers on the last day was also incredible. Natalie really enjoyed the grey glacier, as she had never seen one before.

What would you have changed about your trip to Torres del Paine?

One thing that would have changed our plans was the advice we got (before leaving aus) that we couldn’t get a bus in winter from puerto natales over to el calafete in argentina to see perito moreno. We found this was not correct, it seemed buses were leaving natales almost every day to el calefete and we met multiple people who had done just that and see both. Anyway I can’t remember if it was you guys or the contacts at chile nativo that gave that advice, but that’s not the case and because we had already planned the next stage of our trip back up in northern chile we couldn’t just go while we were there. Our guide on the ground knew that it was possible, so perhaps the chile nativo contact based in Santiago (I think) could get updates from the guides in natales.